Planetary Transit

Lunar Eclipse

Four lunar eclipses will appear across Earth's skies in 2020. They will all be penumbral eclipses, which means the face of the moon will appear to turn a darker silver color for a few hours. Weather permitting, people across most locations on our planet will catch at least one of the lunar eclipses falling on Jan. 10-11, June 5-6, July 4-5 and Nov. 29-30.

There's always a place on Earth where the sun don't shine. In the space above the planet's night side is Earth's cone-shaped shadow. It's impossible to see most of the time, but when the moon passes through part of the shadow, its existence becomes apparent. 

There are two parts to Earth's shadow, creating three possibilities for a lunar eclipse. Earth's atmosphere bends sunlight, so the planet doesn't cast a jet-black shadow. So, if the whole moon passes through the innermost part of Earth's shadow, we see a copper-colored lunar face. This is known as a total lunar eclipse, or a "blood moon." 

In 2020, we'll observe four penumbral lunar eclipses. This is when the moon only passes through Earth's penumbra, the outer part of the planet's cone-shaped shadow. If the moon clipped even a part of the inner shadow, called the umbra, these events would be called partial lunar eclipses. 


(Updated Date & Time :- 2020-03-03 10:14:58 )


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